It’s the Kielbasa kid…

and another 420 may have come and gone but I seriously doubt many have packed away their rolling papers and other paraphernalia for next year’s celebration. It’s just like some folks who leave their Christmas lights up all year. You never know, you might get the urge to fire them up some warm evening over the summer to watch them twinkle. Who would have ever thought something that was vilified thanks in large part to the 1930’s film Reefer Madness would have it’s own holiday but that’s what 420 has become, a stoner holiday. But how did it get started and why 420? Some say 420 is code among the police for marijuana smoking in progress but that’s been debunked. Others have pointed to the Bob Dylan song where he sings “everyone must get stoned” but that’s not the name of the song, it’s called Rainey Day Women 12 & 35. So how do you get 420 from that. Well I’m willing to bet a couple of stoners sat around thinking about that very thing and realized that 12 multiplied by 35 equals 420. But legend has it that 420 started like everything else on the left coast and by 5 high school students at San Rafael High school in Marin County California. Back in 1971 these 5 student’s would meet at 4:20 in the afternoon by the campus statue of chemist Louie Pasteur and partake in the giggle weed. It seems that was the time of day all the extracurricular activities at school usually ended. I’ll bet after about 5 or 6 meetings someone noticed, “you know, every time we meet here to get high, it’s always 420”. You’d think they would hence forth be known as the 420 group or the Louie Pasteur group but no, they became known as the Waldo’s because of the wall that was next to the statute. It really started to take off in 1990 when one of the guys in the Waldos got a job as a roadie for Grateful Dead bassist, Phil Lesh. The band is said to have help popularize the term 420 and in December of 1990 a group of Deadheads in Oakland California handed out flyers inviting people to smoke the hippy lettuce on 420 or April 20 at 4:20 in the afternoon. One of those flyers ended up in the hands of a former reporter for High Times magazine, an authority on cannabis culture. In 1991 the magazine printed the flyer and continued to reference the number and it soon became know world wide as code for marijuana. In 1998 the outlet acknowledged that the Waldos were the inventors of 420 and ever since its been onward through the fog as a stoner holiday.